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Alternative Federal Budget 2019

Sub Title: 
No Time to Lose
Author(s): 
Release Date: 
Tuesday, September 18, 2018
Number of pages in documents: 
84 pages
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1.26 MB84 pages

With the country facing significant and unpredictable headwinds going into another federal election year, the 2019 Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) shows that Canada can boost competitiveness and encourage innovation by investing in people, not by giving corporations more tax cuts.

Boom, Bust and Consolidation

The five largest bitumen-extractive corporations in Canada control 79.3 per cent of Canada’s productive capacity of bitumen. The Big Five—Suncor Energy, Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL), Cenovus Energy, Imperial Oil and Husky Energy—collectively control 90 per cent of existing bitumen upgrading capacity and are positioned to dominate Canada’s future oil sands development.

Offices: 

Contract jobs now account for majority of university faculty appointments in Canada

Release Date: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

New study examines reliance on precarious jobs on university campuses; Ontario, Quebec and B.C. have contract faculty rates above national average.

OTTAWA—Canadian universities are relying heavily on precariously-employed faculty on campus, according to a new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

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Universitaires précaires

Sub Title: 
Les nominations d’enseignants contractuels, la tendance dans les universités canadiennes
Release Date: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018
Number of pages in documents: 
60 pages
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1.54 MB60 pages

Les universités canadiennes dépendent énormément des enseignants précaires sur les campusAyant déjà été parmi les professions les plus sûres au pays, en 2016-2017 les emplois contractuels dans le secteur représentaient la majorité (53,6 pour cent) de toutes les nominations d’enseignants universitaires, et ce selon les données obtenues par l’entremise de demandes d’accès à l’information envoyées aux 78 universités canadiennes financées par l’État.

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