Subscribe to Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives RSS

Working for a Living Wage 2019

Sub Title: 
Making paid work meet basic family needs in Metro Vancouver
Release Date: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019
Attached Document Title: 
Working for a Living Wage 2019
Working for a Living Wage 2019 Calculation Guide
Working for a Living Wage 2019 Calculation Spreadsheet
Working for a Living Wage 2008 Original Report
Number of pages in documents: 
8 pages
28 pages
1 pages
52 pages
Download
1.01 MB8 pages

For those seeking to calculate the living wage in other BC and Canadian communities, you can download the living wage calculation guide and spreadsheet (below). And please let the Living Wage Campaign know what you come up with — they're working on keeping track of amounts across the province and across Canada: [email protected].

You can also contact the campaign if you want to become a living wage employer or to participate in the work of the campaign.

BC’s child care investments have major impact on 2019 living wage

Dramatically lower out-of-pocket child care costs offset increases in other family expenses
Release Date: 
Wednesday, May 1, 2019

VANCOUVER—Living wage calculations for communities across BC decreased significantly this year, according to a new report released today from the Living Wage for Families Campaign. Even though costs are increasing steeply for rent and other basic necessities, the cost of living for families with children is lower in 2019 thanks to the provincial government’s new child care policies.

Projects: 
Offices: 

The 2019 living wage for Metro Vancouver

The 2019 living wage for Metro Vancouver is $19.50/hour. This is the amount needed for a family of four with each of two parents working full-time at this hourly rate to pay for necessities, support the healthy development of their children, escape severe financial stress and participate in the social, civic and cultural lives of their communities.

Projects: 
Offices: 

Time to regulate gas prices in BC and stop industry gouging

Drivers in Metro Vancouver are reeling from record high gas prices, and many commentators are blaming taxes. But it’s not taxes causing pain at the pump — it’s industry gouging.

Our latest research shows that gas prices have gone up by 55 cents per litre since 2016 — and the vast majority of that increase (49 cents) is going straight to big oil companies.

Offices: 

Time for BC to regulate gas prices, end gouging by oil companies: CCPA economist

Price increase at pump largely going to industry coffers
Release Date: 
Monday, April 29, 2019

VANCOUVER—It’s time for BC to follow the Maritime provinces and regulate gas prices to end gouging that has caused gas prices in Metro Vancouver to skyrocket, says a senior economist with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office. 

“It’s not taxes that are causing the current pain at the pump, it’s industry gouging,” says Marc Lee. “Alberta’s oil industry is making huge excess profits at the expense of Metro Vancouver drivers.” 

Issue: 
Offices: 

Canadian investor-state lawsuits disproportionately target environmental policy in developing nations: study

Release Date: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019

OTTAWA—Canadian investors disproportionately target environmental policy in developing nations when they file investor-state lawsuits outside North America, according to new analysis released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Environmental policy is the fastest growing trigger for such investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) cases.

Offices: 

Digging for Dividends

Sub Title: 
The use and abuse of investor-state dispute settlement by Canadian investors abroad
Release Date: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
53 pages
Download
1.27 MB53 pages

Investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) cases launched by Canadian investors outside North America follow a pattern of disproportionately targeting environmental policy in developing nations. Environmental policy is the fastest growing trigger for such cases.

This report finds that since 1999, Canadian investors have initiated at least 43 ISDS claims against countries outside North America, whereas only one case has ever been brought against Canada by investors from a country other than the U.S. or Mexico.