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Saskatchewan child care gets a failing grade: report

Release Date: 
Friday, February 1, 2019

Regina — Canada ranks very poorly among peer nations for overall quality measures and rates of access to regulated child care, and Saskatchewan ranks the lowest of all Canadian provinces. A new report from the CCPA-Saskatchewan explores the piecemeal way in which child care policy has been developed by successive governments of all political stripes since 1969, and offers several recommendations for how to improve child care services that are of vital interest to the public.

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Saskatchewan's Failing Report Card on Child Care

Release Date: 
Friday, February 1, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
16 pages
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765.97 KB16 pages

Canada ranks very poorly among peer nations for overall quality and rates of access to regulated child care, with Saskatchewan ranking the lowest of all Canadian provinces. This study examines the history and consequences of the province's neglect in the important area of child care.

Early Childhood Educators in Nova Scotia feeling “unappreciated and underpaid,” results of new workforce survey reveals

Release Date: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Halifax—The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia (CCPA-NS) released a new report today that provides a snapshot of what it is like for Early Childhood Educators (ECE) to work in the Early Learning and Child Care sector in Nova Scotia. Understanding which factors influence their recruitment and retention is critical because we know high turnover affects the quality of the care provided.

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"Unappreciated and underpaid"

Sub Title: 
Early Childhood Educators in Nova Scotia
Release Date: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
55 pages
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645.38 KB55 pages

This report provides a snapshot of what it is like for Early Childhood Educators (ECE) to work in the Early Learning and Child Care sector in Nova Scotia. Understanding which factors contribute to employers’ ability to recruit and retain highly-educated ECEs is critical to the provision of care that families depend on across the province.

A New Revenue Tool

Sub Title: 
The case for a Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area sales tax
Release Date: 
Friday, January 25, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
8 pages
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282.45 KB8 pages

This paper looks at how much revenue could be raised from a sales tax in the City of Toronto or in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA). It provides an example of an enhancement to the sales tax credit to mitigate the impact on low-income households and estimates the distributional impact. 

The State of Ontario’s Finances

Sub Title: 
Cutting through the fog ahead of the 2019 budget
Author(s): 
Release Date: 
Thursday, January 10, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
12 pages
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342.09 KB12 pages

In advance of the Ford government’s first Ontario budget, this report examines the fiscal implications of the government’s actions so far, and the contradictions between those actions and repeated declarations on the need for fiscal prudence. The 2019 Ontario budget will reveal where this government is taking public services and finances. While the Ford government has announced that balancing the budget and reducing the province’s debt is a top priority, it has reduced revenues rather than increase them.

The Double-Pane Glass Ceiling

Sub Title: 
The Gender Pay Gap at The Top Of Corporate Canada
Author(s): 
Release Date: 
Wednesday, January 2, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
32 pages
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664.8 KB32 pages

For the first time, this report examines differences in pay between male and female corporate executives. It reveals a significant gender pay gap in Canada’s C-suite, undercutting the “merit” argument often used to justify extreme levels of executive compensation. Among top executives, women make $0.68 for every dollar their male colleagues make, amounting to $950,000 less in pay a year. The ratio is $0.83 among all fulltime workers.

Mint Condition

Sub Title: 
CEO pay in Canada
Author(s): 
Release Date: 
Wednesday, January 2, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
18 pages
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793.62 KB18 pages

Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs netted 197 times more than the average worker made in 2017, earning the average yearly wage ($50,759) before lunch on January 2. This report shows the country’s 100 highest paid CEOs on the S&P/TSX Composite index made an average of $10 million in 2017, slightly less than last year’s report but still the second highest amount since the CCPA has been keeping track.

Le rapport en français est disponible içi.

The Monitor, January/Febuary 2019

Sub Title: 
The Right to the City
Release Date: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2019
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7.27 MB

Ten years ago the political geographer David Harvey wrote, “The freedom to make and remake our cities and ourselves is…one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights.” With roots in 1960s civil rights struggles, Henri Levebvre's concept of a "right to the city" was revitalized by Harvey and others in the heat of the 2008 financial crisis and Occupy Wall Street.

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