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Study reveals highest and lowest child care fees in Canadian cities in 2018

Impacts of new provincial affordability policies offer lessons for decision makers
Release Date: 
Thursday, February 7, 2019

OTTAWA —A new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) updates the ranking of most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. Fees have risen faster than inflation in 61% of cities since 2017, although in 2018, the number of provinces with policies directly targeting fee affordability has doubled.

Offices: 

Stades de développement

Sub Title: 
Frais de garde d’enfants dans les plus grandes villes du Canada — 2018
Release Date: 
Thursday, February 7, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
42 pages
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987.7 KB42 pages

Cette étude met à jour le classement des villes, de la plus chère à la moins chère au Canada, pour les services de garde à l’enfance. Les frais de garde ont augmenté plus rapidement que l’inflation dans 61 pour cent des villes depuis l’an passé, et ce, même si en 2018 le nombre de provinces qui ont mis en œuvre des politiques visant à réduire les frais de garde a doublé.

Developmental Milestones

Sub Title: 
Child care fees in Canada’s big cities 2018
Release Date: 
Thursday, February 7, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
37 pages
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873.36 KB37 pages

This report updates the ranking of the most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. The study finds that fees have risen faster than inflation in 61% of cities since 2017. However, in 2018, the number of provinces with policies directly targeting fee affordability has doubled. 

The study, the fifth in a series, provides an annual snapshot of median parental child care fees in Canada’s 28 biggest cities for full-time regulated child care of infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Fees were surveyed between May-August 2018.

Saskatchewan child care gets a failing grade: report

Release Date: 
Friday, February 1, 2019

Regina — Canada ranks very poorly among peer nations for overall quality measures and rates of access to regulated child care, and Saskatchewan ranks the lowest of all Canadian provinces. A new report from the CCPA-Saskatchewan explores the piecemeal way in which child care policy has been developed by successive governments of all political stripes since 1969, and offers several recommendations for how to improve child care services that are of vital interest to the public.

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Saskatchewan's Failing Report Card on Child Care

Release Date: 
Friday, February 1, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
16 pages
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765.97 KB16 pages

Canada ranks very poorly among peer nations for overall quality and rates of access to regulated child care, with Saskatchewan ranking the lowest of all Canadian provinces. This study examines the history and consequences of the province's neglect in the important area of child care.

Early Childhood Educators in Nova Scotia feeling “unappreciated and underpaid,” results of new workforce survey reveals

Release Date: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Halifax—The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia (CCPA-NS) released a new report today that provides a snapshot of what it is like for Early Childhood Educators (ECE) to work in the Early Learning and Child Care sector in Nova Scotia. Understanding which factors influence their recruitment and retention is critical because we know high turnover affects the quality of the care provided.

Offices: 

"Unappreciated and underpaid"

Sub Title: 
Early Childhood Educators in Nova Scotia
Release Date: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
55 pages
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645.38 KB55 pages

This report provides a snapshot of what it is like for Early Childhood Educators (ECE) to work in the Early Learning and Child Care sector in Nova Scotia. Understanding which factors contribute to employers’ ability to recruit and retain highly-educated ECEs is critical to the provision of care that families depend on across the province.

A New Revenue Tool

Sub Title: 
The case for a Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area sales tax
Release Date: 
Friday, January 25, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
8 pages
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282.45 KB8 pages

This paper looks at how much revenue could be raised from a sales tax in the City of Toronto or in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA). It provides an example of an enhancement to the sales tax credit to mitigate the impact on low-income households and estimates the distributional impact. 

The State of Ontario’s Finances

Sub Title: 
Cutting through the fog ahead of the 2019 budget
Author(s): 
Release Date: 
Thursday, January 10, 2019
Number of pages in documents: 
12 pages
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342.09 KB12 pages

In advance of the Ford government’s first Ontario budget, this report examines the fiscal implications of the government’s actions so far, and the contradictions between those actions and repeated declarations on the need for fiscal prudence. The 2019 Ontario budget will reveal where this government is taking public services and finances. While the Ford government has announced that balancing the budget and reducing the province’s debt is a top priority, it has reduced revenues rather than increase them.