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Child and Family Poverty in Halifax

Sub Title: 
2017 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia Addendum
Release Date: 
Wednesday, December 13, 2017
Number of pages in documents: 
16 pages
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601.08 KB16 pages

This addendum to the 2017 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia finds that 13,690 children, almost one in five, were living in poverty in the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) in 2015. At 18.8%, Halifax has the 7th highest child poverty rate among the 25 large Canadian cities. There are five communities within HRM that have child poverty rates between 35 and 40%.

Time Out

Sub Title: 
Child care fees in Canada 2017
Release Date: 
Tuesday, December 12, 2017
Number of pages in documents: 
31 pages
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989.66 KB31 pages

This study, the fourth in a series beginning in 2014, reveals the most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. The study provides an annual snapshot of median parental child care fees in Canada’s 28 biggest cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. For the first time ever, the study also includes child care fees in selected rural areas. 

The study finds that child care fees have risen faster than inflation in 71% of the cities since last year, and in 82% of cities since 2014.

Charting a path to $15/hour for all workers—and the road beyond

Sub Title: 
CCPA-BC Submission to the Fair Wages Commission
Release Date: 
Thursday, November 23, 2017
Attached Document Title: 
Charting a Path to $15/hour for all Workers - and the Road Beyond
Number of pages in documents: 
10 pages
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10.68 MB10 pages

In this submission to the BC Fair Wages Commission, the CCPA-BC highlights the urgency for British Columbia to adopt a $15 minimum wage by March 2019. 

BC’s current minimum wage is a poverty-level wage. Low-wage workers need a significant boost to their income and they have been waiting a long time. Over 400,000 British Columbians—22 per cent of all paid employees in the province—work for less than $15 per hour and they would significantly benefit from a $15 minimum wage.

The Lion’s Share

Sub Title: 
Pension deficits and shareholder payments among Canada’s largest companies
Release Date: 
Tuesday, November 21, 2017
Number of pages in documents: 
26 pages
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328.47 KB26 pages

This study examines the status of the defined benefit (DB) pension plans of Canada's largest publicly-traded companies. Thirty-nine companies on the S&P/TSX 60 maintain DB pension plans, amounting to one-third of all private sector pension plan assets in Canada. However, only nine plans were fully funded in 2016. Together, the 39 companies oversaw a $10.8 billion deficit in their pension plans in 2016, while increasing shareholder payouts from $31.9 billion in 2011 to $46.9 billion last year.

Canada’s largest companies prioritizing shareholder payouts over pension contributions

Release Date: 
Tuesday, November 21, 2017

OTTAWA—Last year, Canada’s largest publicly-traded companies paid out four times more to shareholders than it would have cost to fully fund their defined benefit (DB) pension plans, according to new research released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).

Thirty-nine companies on the S&P/TSX 60 maintain DB pension plans, amounting to one-third of all private sector pension plan assets in Canada. However, only nine plans were fully funded in 2016.

Offices: 

CCPA-BC joins community, First Nation, environmental groups in call for public inquiry into fracking

Today the CCPA's BC Office joined with 16 other community, First Nation and environmental organizations to call for a full public inquiry into fracking in Britsh Columbia.

The call on the new BC government is to broaden a promise first made by the NDP during the lead-up to the spring provincial election, and comes on the heels of new revelations about the fracking process, including:

Offices: