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First published in the Winnipeg Free Press, Dec 6, 2016 Those of us who were hoping that the Throne Speech would have details about a strategy for Manitoba’s North were disappointed.   There seems to be a deliberate effort to not mention the Port of Churchill or the Hudson Bay Rail Line in any mention of the North. The absence is odd given the necessity of both for the regional economy and in the case of Churchill’s deep-water port, Arctic sovereignty.
While it is widely recognized that Aboriginal people are over-represented in the urban homeless population, most research has focused on Aboriginal homelessness in metropolitan areas. Very little attention has been paid to the issue in small northern towns. The small amount of research that has been done on the topic suggests that there are also challenges associated with Aboriginal homelessness in more remote urban areas, and that there are unique aspects to homeless populations in these areas.
In light of Media Democracy day on November 19th, the Saskatchewan Office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is pleased to release "Decolonizing the Media: Challenges and Obstacles on the Road to Reconciliation" by Dr. Patricia Elliott of the University of Regina School of Journalism. 
Tsleil-Waututh leaders sign the Treaty Alliance Against the Tar Sands in Vancouver on September 22, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey/National Observer.
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press, Sept 28, 2016 The recent death of Larry Morrissette is a major loss, not only to his family and friends but also to the many Indigenous and non-Indigenous people that he has worked closely with in recent decades in efforts to re-build Winnipeg’s inner city and revitalize Indigenous cultures.
A new Errol Black Chair report released today examines how events are unfolding in Churchill and The Pas. It puts these events in the context of the entire Northern region and urges government to consider the needs and aspirations of Manitoba's Northerners when considering the best way to help.
In November 1885, eight Indigenous men were hanged in Fort Battleford, Saskatchewan. These eight men were executed by the North West Mounted Police as part of a campaign to break down North West Resistance efforts in the prairies. Native children at Battleford Industrial School, a nearby residential school, were brought out to watch their relatives hang.
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Manitoba office interviews Social Enterprise participants from Build and Manitoba Green Retrofit.  Great stories and great ideas.
Social enterprises fill an important gap in Manitoba’s economy for those struggling to enter the workforce. The Manitoba provincial government has seen the value of investing in social enterprises through funding training and procuring housing retrofit services. This in combination with financing from the Manitoba Hydro Pay As You Save (PAYS) program is producing great results. For instance, 194 people are employed in the six social enterprises involved in this study. See report for full study.
Social enterprises fill an important gap in Manitoba’s economy for those struggling to enter the workforce. The provincial government has seen the value of investing in social enterprises through funding training and procuring housing retrofit services. This in combination with financing from the Manitoba Hydro Pay As You Save (PAYS) program is producing great results. For instance, 194 people are employed in the six social enterprises involved in this study.