Children and youth

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 “The root causes of neglect—including poverty, poor housing, food insecurity, and substance abuse—lie beyond the scope of the child welfare system to resolve. But a collaborative approach, working with parents and harnessing the collective resources of child welfare and other provincial government departments, other levels of government, and the province’s many community-based organizations, can make a difference for vulnerable families.”  Honourable Ted Hughes, 2014)
Canada's child care systems can vary dramatically from province to province and city to city, but two things hold true in nearly all places: child care is expensive and regulated spaces are hard to find. In our latest report, we examine median unsubsidized child care fees in Canada's biggest 27 cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, as well as the different subsidization regimes that reduce costs for low-income families. 
The study reveals the most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. It examines median unsubsidized child care fees in Canada's biggest 27 cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, as well as the different subsidization regimes that reduce costs for low-income families. It finds Canada's child care systems can vary dramatically from province to province and city to city, but two things hold true in nearly all places: child care is expensive and regulated spaces are hard to find.
OTTAWA—A new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) reveals the most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. The study examines median unsubsidized child care fees in Canada's biggest 27 cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, as well as the different subsidization regimes that reduce costs for low-income families. It finds Canada's child care systems can vary dramatically from province to province and city to city, but two things hold true in nearly all places: child care is expensive and regulated spaces are hard to find.
Poverty is deeply-rooted, spatially-concentrated, complex, often racialized, and not quickly solved. It damages, and in some cases ruins, the lives of those who it affects. We all pay the price for this. But is it true that nothing is working in the fight against poverty? 
Early childhood development plays a critical role in a person’s health and welfare throughout their life, affecting everything from scholastic success to employment to physical health. This translates to significant consequences for the economy: It’s estimated that every new dollar invested in programs that support healthy childhood development (e.g., parental leave, income support, child care) returns $6 to the GDP over a child’s lifetime. Unfortunately, Canada has the weakest public funding for early childhood development among wealthy countries.
Since 1999, Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Cards have recorded changes in child poverty rates to track progress on the House of Commons' 1989 pledge to end child poverty by the year 2000. This year’s report—now 15 years after the pledge deadline—takes an in-depth look at child and family poverty in Nova Scotia and finds that both are still on the rise.
HALIFAX— Child and family poverty in Nova Scotia has increased. The most recent data reveal that 37,650 children, more than 1 in 5, were living in poverty in 2013. According to the 2015 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia, 22.5% of Nova Scotian children were living in families with low incomes. Many families, especially those with very young children, are struggling to make ends meet with incomes well below the poverty line.
There are unsung heroes in Winnipeg’s inner city, especially in the Aboriginal community, and few of them have a list of accomplishments as long and as significant as does Kathy Mallett. Winnipeg’s inner city today is an exciting place, bursting with positive change. Kathy Mallett has been a key person in laying the foundations for these changes.
Thirteen federal elections ago, in 1970, the Royal Commission on the Status of Women recommended a national childcare program. Fast-forward to 2015, and Canadian parents are more desperate than ever for affordable, quality childcare.