Children and youth

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Numerous studies have demonstrated that quality child care has a positive correlation with improved childhood outcomes, notably higher social and cognitive scores upon school entry, especially with children living in poverty. On Wednesday May 13th child care advocates from across Canada are joining together to call for a universally accessible, quality and comprehensive child care system. This system would benefit all children, especially the most vulnerable to poverty and social exclusion.
This publication examines the Nova Scotia government’s investment in the early years, and finds that it is shamefully inadequate. The report makes it clear that that the lack of financial support for Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) neglects a significant and growing body of evidence that this investment pays dividends in spades: it is critical for labour force development, will help retain and attract people to our communities, and provides an overall boost to the economy. 
Halifax—Nova Scotia suffers from tunnel vision on the economic problems and solutions facing the province. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia just released a publication, A New Economy Needs Child Care, in an attempt to take the blinders off.
Families in Canada deserve affordable child care, but costs vary widely across Canada. Many Canadians don’t know that Quebec has the least expensive child care in the country at $7.30/day. Quebec’s fixed fee puts the province at the top of the list for child care affordability, meanwhile in big cities like Toronto, parents pay $49/day, and in Vancouver it's $41 a day (for toddlers/preschoolers).
The work and family lives of Canadians have evolved over the past three decades. It's time our family policies grew up, too. This study finds the current federal government's approach to family policy is falling short of the needs of parents. It makes the case for access to affordable childcare, improved leave for fathers, and tax policies that level the playing field in order to improve the quality of family life in Canada. The study also provides an analysis of the cost and distributional impact of income splitting for families with children under 18.
The work and family lives of Canadians have evolved over the past three decades. It's time our family policies grew up, too.
OTTAWA—The current federal government's approach to family policy is falling short of the needs of parents, says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
A new report released today by the CCPA-NS in partnership with the Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Labour (NLFL), highlights the complexity of youth employment, attraction and retention in Newfoundland and Labrador, and points to critical pathways for more effectively addressing these issues.
This report draws on the experience and insights of youth and employers, and serves as a check-in on the extensive research previously undertaken to develop a Youth Retention and Attraction Strategy for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It identifies clear tensions between the needs and expectations of young workers and employers’ ability to create opportunities and working environments to deal with such challenges.