Gender equality

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Supportive Housing is an important model on the housing continuum and a positive choice for many people living with mental illness. Whether it is because a person faces greater challenges or because they do not wish to live alone, supportive housing, commonly referred to as “group homes”, holds the potential of being a place where residents may develop a greater sense of personal community, as well as providing the additional safety and support that comes with round the clock staff.
This study ranks Canada’s 25 largest metropolitan areas based on a comparison of how men and women are faring in five areas: economic security, leadership, health, personal security, and education. It is intended to provide an annual measure of the gaps that exist between men and women in communities across Canada and serve as a reminder that, with the right choices and policies, these gaps can be closed. According to the ranking, Victoria is the best city to be a woman and Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo is the worst.
Canada has a gender gap. When it comes to pay, jobs, and safety, men and women still don't get equal treatment in this country. Our latest report on how women are faring in Canada's largest 25 metropolitan areas, and the illustrated ranking below, is intended to provide an annual measure of the gaps that exist between men and women in communities across Canada. It is also a reminder that with the right choices and policies these gaps can be closed.
OTTAWA—A new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) reveals the best and worst cities to be a woman in Canada. According to the study, Victoria is the best city to be a woman and Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo is the worst.
For families with school-aged children, summer is one of the most stressful and expensive times of the year as they scramble to find and pay for child care. But for parents of younger children, that’s a year-round struggle. At about $10,000 a year, four years of child care can easily add up to more than the cost of a university degree. And that’s if you’re lucky enough to find a spot, since BC only has enough regulated child care spaces for 27% of children under six.
This study shows how BC can implement a $10 a day child care plan, either as a federal-provincial partnership or as a BC-only program. The province can easily afford it, and it will provide huge benefits for families, communities and the economy. The study uses the $10 A Day Plan, developed by BC child care experts, as its basis. More information about the plan here: 10aday.ca.
(Vancouver) A $10 a day child care program in BC would largely pay for itself through the considerable boost to provincial and federal government revenues from more women participating in the workforce. “Universal child care is entirely affordable for BC, either as a federal-provincial partnership or a BC-only program like the one in Quebec,” says Iglika Ivanova, a senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and author of Solving BC’s Child Care Affordability Crisis: Financing the $10 A Day Plan.
BC can solve the affordability crisis in child care with a $10 a day child care plan. This will save families thousands of dollars, stimulate the economy and benefit all of us.
Kate McInturff, senior policy researcher at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, gave a speech about women's poverty in Canada at an event hosted by the Canadian Women's Foundation, on June 9, 2015.
Our research study responds to questions: how do female students define and measure their own successes? And what factors have contributed to their successes? Bonnycastle and Simpkins interviewed 27 female postsecondary students. See full report above.