Inequality and poverty

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Photo from the U.S. Department of Agriculture
Canada is addicted to oil. Like all addictions, ours is debilitating. It has erased the line between state and private industry (thin as that line is in most countries), stifles our politics, and is holding back local, provincial and national preparations for a world without fossil fuels. Curing our addiction to oil and gas will take time and money, and historic levels of Indigenous–federal–provincial co-operation. But it absolutely has to happen—starting now.
On May 1, the Living Wage for Families Campaign released new living wage rates for 12 BC communities. Even though costs are increasing steeply for rent and other basic necessities, the cost of living for families with children is lower this year thanks to the provincial government’s new child care policies.
This report provides an up-to-date calculation of a living wage for workers living in St. John's. The report finds that in order to earn a living wage, a person working a full time, full year job in St. John’s would need to be paid $18.85 an hour. Currently, almost 70,000 workers in Newfoundland and Labrador earn less than $15 dollars an hour, the majority of which are women. For a minimum wage worker to earn the equivalent of a living wage in St. John’s, that individual would have to work at least 58 hours a week.
(HALIFAX, NS/ST.JOHN’S, NL)—In order to earn a living wage, a person working a full time, full year job in St. John’s would need to be paid $18.85 an hour, according to a new report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ office based in Nova Scotia.
For those seeking to calculate the living wage in other BC and Canadian communities, you can download the living wage calculation guide and spreadsheet (below). And please let the Living Wage Campaign know what you come up with — they're working on keeping track of amounts across the province and across Canada: [email protected] You can also contact the campaign if you want to become a living wage employer or to participate in the work of the campaign.
VANCOUVER—Living wage calculations for communities across BC decreased significantly this year, according to a new report released today from the Living Wage for Families Campaign. Even though costs are increasing steeply for rent and other basic necessities, the cost of living for families with children is lower in 2019 thanks to the provincial government’s new child care policies.
Illustration by Eagleclaw Bunnie
Poverty and economic insecurity present a unique hardship for senior women, particularly when combined with the many overlapping challenges of aging: chronic disease, loss of mobility, declining health, loss of a spouse and other friends, ageism, and vulnerability to abuse and neglect. Given that Canada’s population is aging, the gaps in our system of public supports for seniors directly affect ever-widening circles of people.