Inequality and poverty

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En 2017 les 100 PDG les mieux rémunérés au Canada ont touché 197 fois plus que les travailleurs moyens, atteignant leur salaire annuel moyen (50 759 $) le 2 janvier avant l’heure du lunch. Le rapport montre que les 100 PDG des sociétés de l’indice composé S&P/TSX les mieux rémunérés du pays ont gagné en moyenne 10 millions de dollars en 2017, soit un peu moins que l’an dernier, mais ce qui représente tout de même une rémunération qui se trouve en deuxième position depuis que le CCPA effectue le suivi.  
OTTAWA—Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs netted 197 times more than the average worker made in 2017, earning the average yearly wage ($50,759) before lunch on Jan. 2, according to a new report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The report shows the country’s 100 highest paid CEOs on the S&P/TSX Composite index made an average of $10 million in 2017, slightly less than last year’s report but still the second highest amount since the CCPA has been keeping track.
Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs netted 197 times more than the average worker made in 2017, earning the average yearly wage ($50,759) before lunch on January 2. This report shows the country’s 100 highest paid CEOs on the S&P/TSX Composite index made an average of $10 million in 2017, slightly less than last year’s report but still the second highest amount since the CCPA has been keeping track. Le rapport en français est disponible içi.
Illustration by Tim Scarth / Photos of Montreal by the author
Ten years ago the political geographer David Harvey wrote, “The freedom to make and remake our cities and ourselves is…one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights.” With roots in 1960s civil rights struggles, Henri Levebvre's concept of a "right to the city" was revitalized by Harvey and others in the heat of the 2008 financial crisis and Occupy Wall Street.
The right to the city comes out of critical theory, a branch of intellectual thought originating in the early 20th century at the University of Frankfurt. The Frankfurt School consisted of a group of radical scholars who theorized about the rise of mass popular culture and its effect on society.
This study finds milk is significantly costlier in First Nations communities than in Winnipeg and Northern Manitoba. The cost was higher in First Nations with and without access to an all-weather road. The study is based on a milk price survey in August and September 2016 in 26 stores located in 22 communities in north­ern Manitoba (15 First Nation and 8 non-First Nation communities) and 11 stores in Winnipeg for comparative purposes.
TORONTO—Ontario’s labour market shows stubborn patterns of employment and income inequality along racial and gender lines, according to new research from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Ontario (CCPA-ON) office.
Ontario’s labour market shows stubborn patterns of employment and income inequality along racial and gender lines. This report presents a portrait of the province’s racialized labour market as of 2016, and compares it to similar data from 2006. The study finds that racialized workers in Ontario continue to experience higher unemployment rates and significant wage gaps compared to non-racialized workers.  
Transportation is essential for getting almost everything we need in our daily lives. Finding a job or getting to work, getting groceries, seeing friends and family, accessing healthcare or social services all require the ability to get there. But accessing transportation is a major problem for many low-income and Inner City residents who struggle to get to where they need to go, when they need to be there. Understanding this issue is the focus of year’s State of the Inner City report.