Inequality and poverty

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For six weeks in May and June 1919, approximately 35,000 workers in the Prairie city of Winnipeg walked off the job to voice their frustration with a range of issues, from a lack of collective bargaining rights and union recognition to increasing inequality. Indeed, the strike was part of a broader wave of worker revolts that swept across Canada and the world in 1919, as working people in numerous Canadian cities and countries used the strike—the withdrawal of labour power—to push for change.
This May, Canada marks the 100th anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike, when tens of thousands of people walked off their jobs in sympathy and solidarity with building and metal trades workers whose employers were refusing to bargain for fair wages and working conditions.Though the strike failed in its immediate goals, the example it set reverberated across the country and the world, inspiring political upheaval at all levels in Canada, and ultimately transforming the balance of power between workers and the bosses for many generations.
VICTORIA—A new, more generous child benefit for children under 18, funding the CleanBC climate plan and capital investments in infrastructure around the province are positive elements of BC Budget 2019, but more ambitious action is still needed for middle and low income British Columbians, says the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – BC Office.
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Last year, the BC government made a landmark investment to begin addressing the affordability crisis in child care. A new report released by CCPA this week shows just how urgently needed those measures were (and continue to be).
Cette étude met à jour le classement des villes, de la plus chère à la moins chère au Canada, pour les services de garde à l’enfance. Les frais de garde ont augmenté plus rapidement que l’inflation dans 61 pour cent des villes depuis l’an passé, et ce, même si en 2018 le nombre de provinces qui ont mis en œuvre des politiques visant à réduire les frais de garde a doublé.
This report updates the ranking of the most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. The study finds that fees have risen faster than inflation in 61% of cities since 2017. However, in 2018, the number of provinces with policies directly targeting fee affordability has doubled.  The study, the fifth in a series, provides an annual snapshot of median parental child care fees in Canada’s 28 biggest cities for full-time regulated child care of infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Fees were surveyed between May-August 2018.
Canada ranks very poorly among peer nations for overall quality and rates of access to regulated child care, with Saskatchewan ranking the lowest of all Canadian provinces. This study examines the history and consequences of the province's neglect in the important area of child care.
TORONTO—Cities in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area facing growing demands for public services and infrastructure, and a provincial government vowing to cut spending, should turn to a regional sales tax to boost their bottom line, says a new report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Ontario (CCPA-ON) office.
This paper looks at how much revenue could be raised from a sales tax in the City of Toronto or in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA). It provides an example of an enhancement to the sales tax credit to mitigate the impact on low-income households and estimates the distributional impact.