Inequality and poverty

Subscribe to Inequality and poverty
Canadians may remember Paul Martin’s pledge upon becoming Finance Minister that he would eliminate the government’s deficit, “come hell or high water. He fulfilled that promise mainly by slashing support for health care and other social programs, giving Canadians in the process painful doses of both hell and high water.
Ottawa--Canadians remember Paul Martin as the man who slew the deficit dragon "come hell or high water. " He fulfilled that promise by making the largest non-military public program cuts in Canadian history.
HALIFAX: A report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives finds that Canada and Nova Scotia have lost ground in efforts to reduce child poverty. "Promises to Keep: The Nova Scotia Child Poverty Report Card 2003" finds that child poverty today is worse than it was in 1989 when Canadian parliamentarians determined that child poverty should end by the year 2000. According to the report, in 1989 16% of Nova Scotian children lived in poverty. More than a decade later almost 19.2% children in Nova Scotia live in poverty.
HALIFAX - According to a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives the Nova Scotia provincial income tax cut for 2004 will provide minimal, if any, benefit to middle and low income taxpayers, while providing a windfall to wealthy Nova Scotians. The study is part of the CCPA-NS series "Who really Benefits from Nova Scotia's Income Tax Cut." Using the most recent taxation data from Canada Customs and Revenue Agency the study examines the distribution of the income tax cut between 13 income groups.