Public services and privatization

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Ottawa / Washington, D.C. / New York, NY / Mexico City, Mexico—With ratification of NAFTA 2.0 still up in the air in the U.S. and Canada, a new international report contrasts the deeply flawed agreement with proposals for a more progressive and truly fair trade regime.
With ratification of NAFTA 2.0 still up in the air, a new international report looks beyond that deeply flawed agreement to imagine a more progressive and truly fair trade regime. The report, which includes contributions by trade experts and activists from all three North American countries, critically analyzes the USMCA (known as CUSMA in Canada and T-MEC in Mexico) and sets out alternatives that would give priority to human rights and the rights of nature over corporate rights.
We Albertans are patient and fair minded, but we have had enough of your campaign of defamation and double standards. Today, we begin to stand up for ourselves, for our jobs, for our future. Today we begin to fight back. ~ Premier Jason Kenney on election night, April 16, 2019
Canada is addicted to oil. Like all addictions, ours is debilitating. It has erased the line between state and private industry (thin as that line is in most countries), stifles our politics, and is holding back local, provincial and national preparations for a world without fossil fuels. Curing our addiction to oil and gas will take time and money, and historic levels of Indigenous–federal–provincial co-operation. But it absolutely has to happen—starting now.
This report examines the Highway 104 Western Alignment highway, known as the Cobequid Pass Toll Highway. The report reveals that it cost $232 million more to build, finance, operate and maintain as a Public Private Partnership (P3) project than it would have as a government-financed, delivered, and maintained project.  
(HALIFAX, NS)—A new report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia office examines the Highway 104 Western Alignment highway, known as the Cobequid Pass Toll Highway. The report reveals that it cost $232 million more to build, finance, operate and maintain as a Public Private Partnership (P3) project than it would have as a government-financed, delivered, and maintained project.
The issuance of mandate letters to provincial crown corporations has put management and staff on notice, warning that “the old way of doing things” is over.   The preamble for all the letters is the same, with claims that this government is committed to “prudent fiscal management, creating jobs, improving health care and education” etc. etc. Each letter then spells out the specific changes the government expects each crown to make.  
Illustration by Eagleclaw Bunnie
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press Friday April 12, 2019 For years, an open secret in Winnipeg has been the poor quality of service associated with Transit  Plus (previously Handi-Transit), which exists to provide a parallel Winnipeg Transit for those with disabilities. The service provides transportation to approximately 7,500 people a year. Due to problems with the services, the Independent Living Resource Centre (ILRC) was able to, with the assistance of the Public Interest Law Centre (PILC), submit a complaint to the Manitoba Ombudsman.
TORONTO—Today’s Ontario budget will do serious damage to the public services Ontarians depend on, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives Ontario office (CCPA) says. “Cuts like these don’t make Ontario ‘a place to grow,’ they make it a place where people have to just try and survive,” says Sheila Block, CCPA Ontario Senior Economist. “This is a bad news budget.”

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