Indigenous issues

Subscribe to Indigenous issues
Recent attention to issues of addiction in Manitoba has shifted from concern over opioids to methamphetamine use. Questions about government response have remained a hot topic during the run up to the provincial election. As a result harm reduction is starting to become a part of the public discourse.
For immediate release (Winnipeg): A new report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternative’s (CCPA) Manitoba office: Manitoba Hydro, the Long View argues the publicly owned crown corporation offers economic and social benefits that would be lost if the crown were privatized.
Manitoba Hydro has a long history of development and innovation, combined with political controversy and, in the case of First Nation communities, outright exploitation and abuse. But, as this report demonstrates, it would be wrong to suggest that the utility is not changing, or that it has not learnt from past mistakes.
Should we, as citizens of Indigenous nations, be voting in settler elections? It is the question many Indigenous people contend with whenever a federal election draws near. The debate can be tense given Canada’s colonial history, and because many Indigenous people do not identify as “Canadian.”
The pollster Nik Nanos claimed in June that climate change would be “one of the defining battle grounds” this election. “More important than jobs, more important than health care, more important than immigration.” In July, Abacus Data put climate change in third spot behind health care and cost of living, the latter an important issue (with the environment) for the two-thirds of voters from the millennial and gen-X cohorts.
The problems of intimate partner violence and housing insecurity are independent issues and each worthy of discussion on their own. However, for women in northern communities these issues are often co-occurring. Violence is a major con­tributor to women experiencing homelessness, but the threat of homelessness can be an ever-present concern in a place where access to housing is, in its own right, a challenge. This report outlines the literature and identifies gaps.
This qualitative report looks at the experiences of women and children escaping violent relationships when they leave temporary solutions such as crisis centres in Northern Manitoba. Through our re­search, we explored both the geographic moves women make as they seek safety and shelter for themselves and their children and their reasons for making these transitions.  
Ottawa / Washington, D.C. / New York, NY / Mexico City, Mexico—With ratification of NAFTA 2.0 still up in the air in the U.S. and Canada, a new international report contrasts the deeply flawed agreement with proposals for a more progressive and truly fair trade regime.
With ratification of NAFTA 2.0 still up in the air, a new international report looks beyond that deeply flawed agreement to imagine a more progressive and truly fair trade regime. The report, which includes contributions by trade experts and activists from all three North American countries, critically analyzes the USMCA (known as CUSMA in Canada and T-MEC in Mexico) and sets out alternatives that would give priority to human rights and the rights of nature over corporate rights.

Pages