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Illustration by Remie Geoffroi Can we finally admit it? The world really does love Justin Trudeau.
This expanded version of the Monitor summer reading guide takes a break from frenetic social media feeds to assess the fluctuating political and economic reality from a place of relative stability: books. Rather than just telling us what they will be reading this summer, contributors ground longer arguments about the state of the world in recent Canadian and international non-fiction releases with a connection to the CCPA’s underlying mandate: to promote social, economic and environmental justice.
In early May, evidence emerged that natural gas companies had built dozens of large dams during a poorly regulated building spree. As many as 60 large earthen structures were bulldozed into place by fossil fuel companies—without first getting the required authorizations from provincial authorities.
When the provincial government created the Oil and Gas Commission in 1998, it did much more than open a “one stop shop” for speedy oil and gas industry approvals; it also set British Columbia on a collision course with First Nations. The consequences of that collision course are more apparent with each passing day, and are most evident in a potentially precedent-setting civil suit launched by the Blueberry River First Nation (BRFN), whose territory overlays northeast BC’s richest natural gas play—the Montney basin.
This paper looks at the growing concerns that First Nations in British Columbia have with the fossil fuel industry’s increasing need for large volumes of water for natural gas fracking operations.
Our latest report looks at the growing concerns that First Nations in British Columbia have with the fossil fuel industry’s increasing need for large volumes of water for natural gas fracking operations. Learn more at: policyalternatives.ca/protect-shared-waters
VANCOUVER – Coming on the heels of an investigation that revealed fossil fuel companies have built dozens of unauthorized dams in BC’s northeast, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has released a study drawing attention to larger problems with water management practices in that region. The study finds that a sharp increase in water-intensive, natural gas industry fracking operations is underway, yet First Nations who are the most directly impacted by such activities have little say in shaping how, when and where fossil fuel companies operate on their traditional lands. 
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press, Thursday June 8th. On Friday May 26, I attended an impromptu event organized by supporters of the North Point Douglas Women’s Centre.  The event was held to show support for the Centre, which was reeling from the news that it would not receive an expected $120,000 required for its operations.  This represents one third of the Centre’s budget and losing it means that North Point Douglas Women’s Centre will be forced to cut important programs that are serving the community well. It got me thinking about reconciliation.

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