Children and youth

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 Picketers outside George Brown College’s King Street campus in Toronto on November 15, 2017 (Photos by Manzur Malik)
Is your income secure? Do you swipe your credit card at the supermarket without really looking at how much you’re spending? Can you pay all your bills every month? Can you afford your medication? Do your kids have the clothes, shoes and school supplies they need? Is your home safe and warm?
Illustration by Kara Sievewright   Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.
This addendum to the 2017 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia finds that 13,690 children, almost one in five, were living in poverty in the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) in 2015. At 18.8%, Halifax has the 7th highest child poverty rate among the 25 large Canadian cities. There are five communities within HRM that have child poverty rates between 35 and 40%.
HALIFAX — 13,690 children, almost one in five, were living in poverty in Halifax in 2015, according to a new fact sheet released on child and family poverty within the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM). At 18.8%, Halifax has the 7th highest child poverty rate among the 25 large Canadian cities. There are five communities within HRM that have child poverty rates between 35 and 40%.
This study, the fourth in a series beginning in 2014, reveals the most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. The study provides an annual snapshot of median parental child care fees in Canada’s 28 biggest cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. For the first time ever, the study also includes child care fees in selected rural areas.  The study finds that child care fees have risen faster than inflation in 71% of the cities since last year, and in 82% of cities since 2014.
Cette étude, la quatrième d'une série commençant en 2014, révèle les villes les plus coûteuses et les moins chères pour les services de garde au Canada. L'étude fournit un aperçu annuel des frais parentaux médians de garde d'enfants dans les 28 plus grandes villes du Canada pour les nourrissons, les bambins et les enfants d'âge préscolaire. Et pour la première fois, l'étude présente les frais de garde demandés dans certaines régions rurales. Il trouve que les tarifs ont augmenté plus rapidement que l'inflation dans 71 % des villes depuis l'an passé et d
OTTAWA — Une nouvelle étude publiée aujourd'hui par le Centre canadien de politiques alternatives (CCPA) fait le point sur les villes au Canada où les services de garde d'enfants sont les plus chers et les moins chers. Les tarifs ont augmenté plus rapidement que l'inflation dans 71 % des villes depuis l'an passé et dans 82 % des villes depuis 2014.

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