Health, health care system, pharmacare

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Dans le présent document, l’incidence qu’aurait une prolongation des prestations maximales de maladie de l’AE au-delà de 15 semaines est estimée à l’aide de l’outil Base de données et Modèle de simulation de politiques sociales (BD/MSPS) de Statistique Canada3. Le modèle nous permet d’estimer le nombre de personnes qui pourraient avoir recours aux prestations supplémentaires chaque année et le coût annuel net si le maximum des congés de maladie était prolongé. 
In this paper we estimate the impact of an extension of maximum EI sickness benefits beyond 15 weeks using Statistics Canada’s Social Policy Simulation Database and Model (SPSD/M). The model allows us to estimate how many people might use the additional benefit each year and what the net annual cost would be if the maximum sick leave were extended. The paper opens with a brief history of EI sick leave and a snapshot of annual usage patterns and costs. Results of the modelling exercise are then presented with a discussion of potential implications.
For First Nations peoples living in rural and remote areas, accessing diagnostic health services and treatment often requires traveling long distances and, in some cases, relocating to an urban centre for a few weeks, months, or at times, permanently. “Living in the City: Documenting the Lived Experiences of the Island Lake Anishininiew” highlights the realities of 30 First Nations community members experiencing medical relocation and offers recommendations from people with lived experience.
  According to a popular apocryphal tale, the United States and Soviet Union both realized during the space race that a standard pen would not work in orbit. NASA spent millions of dollars to develop an “anti-gravity” pen that would. The Soviets used a pencil.
This book is about the tensions in long-term residential care. By tensions, we mean ideas, approaches, practices, programs, interests and communities that have conflicting demands and/or consequences. There is often, for example, a tension between the need to give priority to the increasingly complex medical needs of residents and the plan to provide the kind of support that emphasizes social care and interpersonal relationships.
  Illustrations by Remie Geoffroi This is a story about two elections: the one about the “change” Ontarians might have had if circumstances hadn’t thrown the province into political chaos, and the one we are now facing, which is about change and much more.
Ontarians heading to the polls on June 7 face a stark choice between two visions of government and two styles of governing. The choice they make could reverberate across the country. A Progressive Conservative victory under the leadership of the right-wing populist Doug Ford would almost certainly usher in another period of harsh and unnecessary austerity, and has the potential to set racial and economic justice back decades.
Canada is only months away from legalizing and regulating the production, sale and use of cannabis for medicinal and recreational purposes. Yet, as we explore in our cover story this issue, the plan is rife with contradictions: a fledgling industry populated by former police chiefs; the fact bills C-45 and C-46 will create dozens of new pot-related offences in the process of removing some of the old ones; the continued prohibition on growing more than four or five plants at home while Canada's "licensed producers" are expected to make billions.

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