Taxes and tax cuts

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OTTAWA—Today the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released The Harper Record 2008-2015, a detailed account of the Conservative government’s economic, environmental, social, foreign policy and democratic records through the 2008 crisis, Great Recession and ongoing economic recovery.
This book, which builds on the 2008 collection The Harper Record, continues a 25-year tradition at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives of periodically examining the records of Canadian federal governments during their tenure.
Twenty years ago, the Mike Harris "Common Sense Revolution" stormed Ontario, waging a fight with the poor, with unions, and with the idea of government itself. What remains from that era in Ontario public policy and what needs fixing: this special publication by the CCPA-Ontario goes over the key moments of the "revolution" and looks at solutions moving forward.
This report suggests that the federal budget’s claims regarding who would benefit from doubling the Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) annual contribution ceiling are erroneous. The analysis finds that the government's claims that raising the annual TFSA contribution ceiling from $5,500 to $10,000 would disproportionately benefit lower- and middle-income Canadians use misleading income groupings and excludes data to show a distributional impact that is directly opposite to the one it actually has.
The 2015 federal budget vehemently argued that raising the annual TFSA contribution ceiling from $5,500 to $10,000 would disproportionately benefit lower- and middle- income Canadians. But is that really the case? Find out what's fact and what's just spin in our handy infographic below. Want to know more? Read our full analysis: The Number Games: Are the TFSA Odds Ever in Your Favour?
OTTAWA—The federal budget’s claims regarding who would benefit from doubling the Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) annual contribution ceiling exclude key contextual data thereby leading to erroneous conclusions, says an analysis released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
HALIFAX— If Nova Scotia hopes to move forward, the current tax system must change. Cuts to corporate taxes and income taxes for the highest earners and increasing reliance on consumption taxes will not help the majority of Nova Scotians, nor will they help us to build a province that is prosperous and just.
In the lead-up to the release of the Nova Scotia provincial budget, the CCPA-NS has published a series of 'budget watch' primers to help Nova Scotians better understand the government’s budgetary decisions. When the budget is released, it is important to ask questions about the government budget’s impact on us, our families and our communities. The primers are designed to provide Nova Scotians with the information necessary to weigh the choices made by our government.
HALIFAX—The Nova Scotia government is set to release the provincial budget on April 9. To help Nova Scotians understand the government’s budgetary decisions, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-NS (CCPA-NS) is releasing a series of budget watch primers. The CCPA-NS budget watch primers are designed to provide Nova Scotians with the information necessary to weigh the choices made by our government. When the budget is released, it is important to ask questions about the government budget’s impact on us, our families and our communities.
In the lead up to the spring 2015 provincial budget, talk about ways to fix Ontario's revenue problem keeps turning to tax options. CCPA-Ontario economist Kaylie Tiessen unpacks the range of revenue options at the province's disposal in this tax primer.