Alternative budgets

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With the country facing significant and unpredictable headwinds going into another federal election year, the 2019 Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) shows that Canada can boost competitiveness and encourage innovation by investing in people, not by giving corporations more tax cuts.
Ten years ago the political geographer David Harvey wrote, “The freedom to make and remake our cities and ourselves is…one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights.” With roots in 1960s civil rights struggles, Henri Levebvre's concept of a "right to the city" was revitalized by Harvey and others in the heat of the 2008 financial crisis and Occupy Wall Street.
The right to the city comes out of critical theory, a branch of intellectual thought originating in the early 20th century at the University of Frankfurt. The Frankfurt School consisted of a group of radical scholars who theorized about the rise of mass popular culture and its effect on society.
In Part 2 of our feature on the state of the economy 10 years after the crisis, the Monitor heads to the bank. With radical ideas for reforming finance's retail, mortgage and investing functions from John Anderson, Michal Rozworski, Kevin Young and Alper Yagci, Roxanne Dubois and Brett Scott. Here's a sample of what you'll find inside this issue:
Alors que le pays fait face à des difficultés importantes et imprévisibles à l’approche d’une nouvelle année d’élection fédérale, le Budget fédéral alternatif (BFA) de 2019 montre que le Canada peut favoriser la compétitivité et encourager l’innovation en investissant dans les personnes, plutôt qu’en accordant d’autres réductions d’impôts aux sociétés.
OTTAWA — Alors que le pays fait face à des difficultés importantes et imprévisibles à l’approche d’une nouvelle année d’élection fédérale, le Budget fédéral alternatif (BFA) de 2019, dévoilé aujourd’hui par le Centre canadien de politiques alternatives (CCPA), montre que le Canada peut favoriser la compétitivité et encourager l’innovation en investissant dans les personnes, plutôt qu’en accordant d’autres réductions d’impôts aux sociétés.
  OTTAWA—With the country facing significant and unpredictable headwinds going into another federal election year, the 2019 Alternative Federal Budget (AFB)—released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)—shows Canada can boost competitiveness and encourage innovation by investing in people, not by giving corporations more tax cuts.
Illustration by Katie Raso
Winnipeg cannot control broader macro pressures such as climate change or a stagnant global economy, but it can prepare for the changes that are coming. It can meet climate change with policy to mitigate damage, slow the rate of change, and build resilience. It can stimulate and grow the local economy while making sure that marginalized citizens are included.

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