Inequality and poverty

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This is a study of the previous provincial government’s policy approach to Community Economic Development (CED). Manitoba at the time was described as a leader in CED. In contrast to the prevailing neoliberalizing winds, “social demo­cratic governments (in Quebec and Manitoba) have been important promoters of CED/Social Economy” (Loxley, Silver and Sexmith, 2007;  see also Sheldrick & Warkentin 2007).
This submission was made to the BC government Rental Housing Task Force to recommend controlling rental costs in British Columbia and specific measures for BC’s Residential Tenancy Act. We believe that bold action to control rental costs must be a central component of a comprehensive and effective poverty reduction plan, and that this issue is among the greatest threats not only to BC's proposed poverty reduction plan but to the government’s overall policy agenda.
First published on CBC online July 8th, 2018 A Ferrari cruises down Portage Avenue past people lining the streets on lawn chairs on Sunday evening in Winnipeg. The $250,000 car purrs along the road, a symbol of incredible wealth. Meanwhile, other Winnipeggers struggle to find bus fare to use our underfunded transit system.
March for a $15/hr minimum wage at the University of Minnesota, April 2015 (Photo by Fibonacci Blue ,Flickr Creative Commons).
(Halifax, NS)----Le montant dont une famille de quatre personnes a besoin quand les deux parents travaillent à temps plein- un salaire convenable--est 19 $ par l’heure à Halifax, 18,18 $ à Saint Jean et 17,75 $ à Antigonish.
June 25, 2018 (Halifax, NS)----Covering the costs to raise a family in the Maritimes requires two adults to be working full-time earning a living wage of $19 an hour in Halifax, $18.18 in Saint John and $17.75 in Antigonish. Since 2016, the living wage rate in Halifax decreased very slightly from $19.17, increased slightly in Antigonish from $17.30. The wages did not change very much because of the full year inclusion of the Canada Child Benefit and its indexation to inflation, which covered all or most of the expense increases.
This report provides updated living wage calculations for families living in Atlantic Canada. Covering the costs to raise a family in the Maritimes requires two adults to be working full-time earning a living wage of $19 an hour in Halifax, $18.18 in Saint John and $17.75 in Antigonish.

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