Inequality and poverty

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Click to enlarge (files open in a new window). You can also download maps (PDF) via the links below. 
For those seeking to calculate the living wage in other BC and Canadian communities, you can download the living wage calculation guide and spreadsheet (below). And please let the Living Wage Campaign know what you come up with — they're working on keeping track of amounts across the province and across Canada: info@livingwageforfamilies.ca. You can also contact the campaign if you want to become a living wage employer or to participate in the work of the campaign.
Today, 11 communities across BC released their local living wage rates. A living wage is the hourly amount that two working parents with two young children must earn to meet their basic expenses.
(Vancouver) The wage needed to cover the costs of raising a family in Metro Vancouver is virtually unchanged in the past year, however, child care and housing costs are major challenges for many families, a report released today finds.
As recently as 40 years ago, old age meant living in poverty for more than a third of Canadian seniors. Thankfully, public programs like the Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement changed this, cutting BC’s seniors’ poverty rate to a low of 2.2% in the mid-1990s, among the lowest in the western world.
They are young and highly educated, but many “sharing economy” workers in the GTA are selling their services under precarious working conditions. Read the first comprehensive look at workers who sell “sharing economy” type services and the consumers who buy them in this new report.
BC seniors are anything but a homogenous group. Large income and wealth inequalities exist among both seniors and working-age British Columbians—the defining problem we face isn’t about intergenerational inequality, but rather the growing gap between rich and poor across generations. This study uses Statistics Canada data to study the economic well-being of BC seniors, and takes a close look at indicators of economic insecurity including core housing need, the costs and accessibility of essential care and prescription medications, and food insecurity. —
Our photo essay, Economic insecurity touches seniors’ lives in profound ways (published alongside the study, Poverty and Inequality Among British Columbia’s Seniors) describes the lived experiences of three senior women living in economic insecurity in BC.
BC seniors are anything but a homogenous group. Large income and wealth inequalities exist among both seniors and working-age British Columbians—the defining problem we face isn’t about intergenerational inequality, but rather the growing gap between rich and poor across generations. Learn more: policyalternatives.ca/SeniorsInequality
(Vancouver) Poverty and economic insecurity among BC seniors is growing, according to a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. After rapid declines over the 1970s, 80s and 90s, seniors’ poverty rose from a low of 2.2% in 1996 to 12.7% in 2014 (the most recent year data is available)—and many more seniors have incomes just above the poverty line.

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