Inequality and poverty

Subscribe to Inequality and poverty
Click to enlarge (files open in a new window). You can also download maps (PDF) via the links below. 
This paper explores the economy, the health status, and particularly the issue of food sovereignty of Garden Hill First Nation (GHFN), a remote community located 610 kilometers northeast of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Similar to many northern communities, in GHFN the history of colonialism, assimilation and the legacy of residential schools have shaped the egregious conditions of poverty that many on-reserve residents struggle with every day.
This report, endorsed by more than 90 organizations, calls on Winnipeg’s Mayor to be a champion for poverty reduction and commit to leading the development of a comprehensive poverty reduction plan. Up to 107,000 Winnipeggers are living in poverty. The community-based plan offers fifty recommendations that the City can implement as part of its own plan in policy areas such as housing, transportation, food security, policing and safety.
For those seeking to calculate the living wage in other BC and Canadian communities, you can download the living wage calculation guide and spreadsheet (below). And please let the Living Wage Campaign know what you come up with — they're working on keeping track of amounts across the province and across Canada: info@livingwageforfamilies.ca. You can also contact the campaign if you want to become a living wage employer or to participate in the work of the campaign.
VANCOUVER — The cost of raising a family in British Columbia increased slightly from 2017 to 2018. And if it hadn’t been for reductions in Medical Service Plan premiums and child care costs, the increase would have been higher, says the Living Wage for Families Campaign.
Alt-Right rally in Washington, D.C., June 2017 (Photo by Blink O'faneye, Flickr Creative Commons)
Energy. It is the perennial election issue in Ontario, and for good reasons. A series of provincial decisions spanning decades has led to long-term structural problems in the electricity sector. As a result, since 2010, electricity prices have risen dramatically. Predictably, so has inequality and energy poverty.
Is your income secure? Do you swipe your credit card at the supermarket without really looking at how much you’re spending? Can you pay all your bills every month? Can you afford your medication? Do your kids have the clothes, shoes and school supplies they need? Is your home safe and warm?

Pages