Inequality and poverty

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In The Fight for a $15 Minimum Wage in Saskatchewan, University of Regina Business professor Dr. Andrew Stevens explodes many of the more prevalent myths about the minimum wage and minimum wage workers. Dr. Stevens shows that minimum wage workers can no longer be perceived as mostly teenagers working part-time in a small family-run business. Rather, minimum wage earners in the province are older, disproportionately female and many work for large, corporate employers. As Dr.
Last week the Manitoba government held a community consultation to help with the development of its poverty reduction plan. The Manitoba Poverty Reduction Strategy Act requires the government to implement a long-term strategy to reduce poverty and increase social inclusion across Manitoba, and update the strategy at least once every five years.  That deadline passed in May of this year. The Act also requires that the government: 
Tuesday morning, I received a phone call from a Make Poverty History Manitoba member. He lives on a disability benefit that provides him only $180 per month for food and other basic necessities. He wanted to know if he can expect any change soon. I told him we would see in the Speech from the Throne that afternoon what, if anything, the Province has planned for its long-promised poverty reduction strategy.
This year’s Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia identifies a slight decrease in child poverty, with 1,600 children lifted out of poverty between 2014 and 2015. Overall, this decrease represented less than a percentage point change, with 21.6% of Nova Scotia children living in poverty. Nova Scotia had the third-highest provincial child poverty rate, and the highest rate in Atlantic Canada.
This study examines the status of the defined benefit (DB) pension plans of Canada's largest publicly-traded companies. Thirty-nine companies on the S&P/TSX 60 maintain DB pension plans, amounting to one-third of all private sector pension plan assets in Canada. However, only nine plans were fully funded in 2016. Together, the 39 companies oversaw a $10.8 billion deficit in their pension plans in 2016, while increasing shareholder payouts from $31.9 billion in 2011 to $46.9 billion last year.
Halifax – The 2017 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia reveals that 35,870 children or more than 1 in 5 children in Nova Scotia were living in poverty in 2015.
OTTAWA—Last year, Canada’s largest publicly-traded companies paid out four times more to shareholders than it would have cost to fully fund their defined benefit (DB) pension plans, according to new research released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Thirty-nine companies on the S&P/TSX 60 maintain DB pension plans, amounting to one-third of all private sector pension plan assets in Canada. However, only nine plans were fully funded in 2016.
According to the Low-Income Cut Off-After Tax (LICO-AT) measure, there were 105,000 Manitobans (approximately 8.9%) living in poverty in 2011. As a percentage, the number of Manitobans living in poverty hasgone down since the 1990s when it averaged 15%.  However, the depth of poverty in Manitoba has not changed and remains, on average, between 25–35% below the poverty line. The average length of time that people are in low income ranges between 2.5 – 2.7 years although some are in poverty for much longer....  Read Andrew Clarks report for the full story!
This report card reviews the federal government's progress in 16 key policy areas at the halfway mark of their term. It finds that, despite some positive first steps, the Liberals’ ambitious talk hasn’t been backed up with the action needed to make these promises a reality. With two years left in the term, the report card includes suggested next steps to help the Liberal government fulfill the progressive agenda they committed to leading up to the election. Among the recommendations:
OTTAWA—After more than 200 sitting days in Parliament, the federal government has not lived up to the vast majority of its progressive promises, according to new analysis released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).