Inequality and poverty

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The eleventh in an annual series, this year's report on CEO compensation finds that, for the first time, Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs netted 209 times more than the average worker made in 2016. Canadian CEOs are again taking home pre-2008-crisis levels of compensation, pushing the income gap between Canada’s top executives and the average worker to record highs.
OTTAWA - Pour la première fois de l'histoire, les 100 hauts dirigeants les mieux rémunérés du Canada ont gagné 209 fois plus que le travailleur moyen en 2016, révèle un nouveau rapport du Centre canadien de politiques alternatives. Le rapport indique que les 100 PDG les mieux rémunérés des sociétés sur l'indice composé S&P/TSX touchent maintenant en moyenne 10,4 millions de dollars, soit 209 fois le revenu moyen de 49 738 $, en hausse par rapport à 193 fois plus en 2015.
OTTAWA – For the first time, Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs netted 209 times more than the average worker made in 2016, according to a new report from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The report shows the country’s highest 100 paid CEOs on the S&P/TSX Composite index now make, on average, $10.4 million — 209 times the average income of $49,738, up from 193 times more in 2015.
Community Economic Development (CED) in Manitoba is ever changing, morphing and evolving. This paper on the other hand is not. These pages contain the history and practice of CED leading up to, and including the summer of 2017.
Disruption. It’s the catchphrase du jour, usually wielded by one presumptuous tech upstart or another to challenge the market power of an allegedly ossifying incumbent. Frequently, but not always, to justify the displacement of low- or middle-income workers with an even more precarious, low-cost, on-demand workforce.
Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a rally in San Baltazar, Chichicapam, Oaxaca in March 2016 (Wikimedia Commons)
This addendum to the 2017 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia finds that 13,690 children, almost one in five, were living in poverty in the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) in 2015. At 18.8%, Halifax has the 7th highest child poverty rate among the 25 large Canadian cities. There are five communities within HRM that have child poverty rates between 35 and 40%.
HALIFAX — 13,690 children, almost one in five, were living in poverty in Halifax in 2015, according to a new fact sheet released on child and family poverty within the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM). At 18.8%, Halifax has the 7th highest child poverty rate among the 25 large Canadian cities. There are five communities within HRM that have child poverty rates between 35 and 40%.
This study, the fourth in a series beginning in 2014, reveals the most and least expensive cities for child care in Canada. The study provides an annual snapshot of median parental child care fees in Canada’s 28 biggest cities for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. For the first time ever, the study also includes child care fees in selected rural areas.  The study finds that child care fees have risen faster than inflation in 71% of the cities since last year, and in 82% of cities since 2014.
Cette étude, la quatrième d'une série commençant en 2014, révèle les villes les plus coûteuses et les moins chères pour les services de garde au Canada. L'étude fournit un aperçu annuel des frais parentaux médians de garde d'enfants dans les 28 plus grandes villes du Canada pour les nourrissons, les bambins et les enfants d'âge préscolaire. Et pour la première fois, l'étude présente les frais de garde demandés dans certaines régions rurales. Il trouve que les tarifs ont augmenté plus rapidement que l'inflation dans 71 % des villes depuis l'an passé et d