Inequality and poverty

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Vancouver — Although there are positive elements to today’s BC government announcement in response to the second report of the Fair Wages Commission, the government’s rejection of the recommendation to include farm workers in the basic minimum wage is extremely frustrating, says the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. 
Fifty years ago today, April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis Tennessee. James Earl Ray was convicted, but as Angela Davis said, “racism was Martin Luther King’s assassin.”
This submission was made to the BC government to share the CCPA-BC's recommendations regarding the development of a British Columbia Poverty Reduction Plan. It highlights relevant CCPA–BC reports detailing why BC needs a poverty reduction plan and what should constitute core elements of such a plan; underscores the CCPA's support for the detailed submission and policy recommendations of the BC Poverty Reduction Coalition; and highlights two particularly importa
There is growing recognition that income inequality has been increasing to undesirable levels in many countries, including Canada.  Part of this because of international research, most famously by Thomas Pikketty's (2013) book Capital in the 21st Century, which demonstrates remarkable increases in inquality since the 1980's, driven by stagnant incomes for the majority of the population and fantastic income gains by those at the very top end of the income distribution.  There has also been a growing recognition that high levels of income inequality create a wide variety of economic
The Nova Scotia Alternative Budget 2018 is a blueprint of a budget for the people. The report lays out a sustainable fiscal framework that supports the development of inclusive and prosperous communities, where we take care of each other and our environment.
March 19, 2018 HALIFAX—The Nova Scotia Alternative Budget 2018, released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Nova Scotia today, is a blueprint of a budget for the people. The report lays out a sustainable fiscal framework that supports the development of inclusive and prosperous communities, where we take care of each other and our environment.
OTTAWA—Today’s federal budget takes positive steps forward on gender equality and science funding but the bold policy moves that will make a real difference for Canadians —child care, pharmacare, health care or closure of tax loopholes—will have to wait for another day, say experts from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
Canada is only months away from legalizing and regulating the production, sale and use of cannabis for medicinal and recreational purposes. Yet, as we explore in our cover story this issue, the plan is rife with contradictions: a fledgling industry populated by former police chiefs; the fact bills C-45 and C-46 will create dozens of new pot-related offences in the process of removing some of the old ones; the continued prohibition on growing more than four or five plants at home while Canada's "licensed producers" are expected to make billions.
Despite being better educated than previous generations, there are fewer decent jobs for younger workers, even after they have paid their dues working entry-level jobs or unpaid internships. They’re taking on considerable student debt only to find a fractured labour market that denies them access to full-time jobs with decent pay and benefits. And it doesn’t seem to matter which sector of the labour market they turn to.