Human rights

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Alt-Right rally in Washington, D.C., June 2017 (Photo by Blink O'faneye, Flickr Creative Commons)
Source: Barrie and District Raging Grannies
Photo by Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail
Ontarians heading to the polls on June 7 face a stark choice between two visions of government and two styles of governing. The choice they make could reverberate across the country. A Progressive Conservative victory under the leadership of the right-wing populist Doug Ford would almost certainly usher in another period of harsh and unnecessary austerity, and has the potential to set racial and economic justice back decades.
Canada is only months away from legalizing and regulating the production, sale and use of cannabis for medicinal and recreational purposes. Yet, as we explore in our cover story this issue, the plan is rife with contradictions: a fledgling industry populated by former police chiefs; the fact bills C-45 and C-46 will create dozens of new pot-related offences in the process of removing some of the old ones; the continued prohibition on growing more than four or five plants at home while Canada's "licensed producers" are expected to make billions.
Illustration by Kara Sievewright   Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.
Illustration by Remie Geoffroi As far back as October 2005, during a Senate committee hearing on the Anti-terrorism Act, Jim Judd, then director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, admitted his agency had a problem relating to some new immigrants and visible minorities in Canada.
Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a rally in San Baltazar, Chichicapam, Oaxaca in March 2016 (Wikimedia Commons)
March 2015 C-51 protest (Photo by Jeremy Board) The Liberal government’s centerpiece national security legislation, a response to the widely unpopular and much-criticized C-51 anti-terrorism bill introduced by the Harper Conservatives, is raising its own serious concerns from human rights and civil liberties advocates.

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