Corporations and corporate power

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On March 6, 2017, the Winnipeg Free Press reported that the Manitoba government was examining Saskatchewan’s experience with using Public Private Partnerships (P3s) to build new public schools. The Saskatchewan government claims that it will save $100m dollars by using P3s, although it was not explained how it arrived at that conclusion.
In this issue: BC’s new (affordable?) housing policies A bleak jobs picture outside BC’s big cities The great log export drain The biggest source of waste in Canadian health care? The private, for-profit sector. BC’s Jobs Plan doesn’t equal a comprehensive poverty reduction plan Joining our CCPA–BC community
The role of big money and corporate lobbying in BC politics has become a major issue as we head into the May provincial election. It’s a problem of central concern to us at the Corporate Mapping Project, a research initiative investigating the power and influence of the fossil fuel industry. In a study published today, we took a close look at political donations by oil, gas and coal companies and their industry associations. We also analyzed information from the BC Lobbyist Registry to find out what kind of access to government these donations help secure.
This study examines the political reach of the fossil fuel industry in British Columbia, as evidenced by donations to political parties and lobbying efforts by oil, gas and coal corporations and industry groups. It finds a remarkable and disturbingly close relationship between industry and the provincial government – one that not only contradicts the province’s stated aim to fight climate change but also undermines democracy and the public interest.
Mapping Political Influence examines the political reach of the fossil fuel industry in British Columbia, as evidenced by donations to political parties and lobbying efforts by oil, gas and coal corporations and industry groups. 
(Vancouver) A new study finds the policy alignment between BC’s provincial government and the fossil fuel industry may be explained, at least in part, by extensive donations to political parties combined with intense, sustained lobbying pressure on public officials. The study also reveals that most of the fossil fuel corporations and industry groups donating and lobbying in BC are headquartered in Calgary, the US and beyond.
Screenshot from the July/August 2009 issue of Upstream Dialogue, a newsletter from the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.
PHOTO CREDIT: kris krüg
This issue of the Monitor features a number of articles and new research coming out of the Corporate Mapping Project, an exciting joint initiative of the University of Victoria, the CCPA’s B.C. and Saskatchewan offices, and the Parkland Institute in Alberta that is making the links between the oil sector and political power in Canada. “People yearn for alternatives to business as usual,” write project co-directors Shannon Daub and Bill Carroll in their introductory article.

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