Environment and sustainability

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Communities across Canada need a national strategy to ensure the move to a zero-carbon economy leaves no one behind. For the first time, this report uses census data to identify the regions in each province with the greatest reliance on fossil fuel jobs. The new analysis comes after the federal government announced last fall it will launch a task force in 2018 on a “just transition” policy framework for certain sectors.
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press January 23, 2018 There was a time when a plan to bury highly radioactive materials 500m from a river that provides drinking water and flows into Lake Winnipeg, would have attracted a fair bit of attention in Manitoba. Maybe even a mild uproar. One imagines the provincial government at least would have had something to say about it. So how is it that this scenario seems destined to unfold – soon – and there is scarcely a murmur to be heard in the public sphere? What has changed?
OTTAWA—Communities across Canada need a national strategy to ensure the move to a zero-carbon economy leaves no one behind, according to a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). For the first time, the report uses census data to identify the regions in each province with the greatest reliance on fossil fuel jobs. 
There was a time when securing a good-paying forestry job in British Columbia was not just an option but an expectation for many. This was a time when the provincial government took an active role in managing our public forests and overseeing the activities of private companies whose workers cut trees, milled wood and made pulp.
This report finds that instead of environmental stewardship, BC has advanced policies of liquidating forests by clear-cutting countless valleys and allowing giant corporations to demolish this great natural asset and move on.
VANCOUVER—BC must dramatically change how forestry is managed and governed if it hopes to reverse today’s troubling trends, says Bob Williams, who served as the province’s forest minister in the early 1970s, in a new report for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Williams says it is essential to shift decision-making away from unaccountable transnational forestry corporations to regional planning councils that are accountable to rural communities and First Nations.
In this issue: Fossil fuel industry accustomed to guarding the hen house, documents reveal Call for public inquiry into fracking Rosenbluth lecture: Inclusive growth and the future of work BC First Nations and renewable energy BC Budget 2018 recommendations Adult basic education 20th anniversary retrospectives Submissions to the new BC government from the CCPA–BC Photos from the 2017 Gala 2017 Power of Youth Awards A crucial time of year for us
Disruption. It’s the catchphrase du jour, usually wielded by one presumptuous tech upstart or another to challenge the market power of an allegedly ossifying incumbent. Frequently, but not always, to justify the displacement of low- or middle-income workers with an even more precarious, low-cost, on-demand workforce.

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