Gender equality

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Poverty and economic insecurity present a unique hardship for senior women, particularly when combined with the many overlapping challenges of aging: chronic disease, loss of mobility, declining health, loss of a spouse and other friends, ageism, and vulnerability to abuse and neglect. Given that Canada’s population is aging, the gaps in our system of public supports for seniors directly affect ever-widening circles of people.
OTTAWA—Budget 2019, tabled today in the House of Commons, takes steps forward on municipal infrastructure, support for seniors and capping the regressive stock option deduction, but missed the mark on delivering housing affordability and the significant cost-savings that can only be achieved through a universal, single-payer pharmacare system, according to experts from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
Study calls for comprehensive review of federal tax policy in Budget 2019 OTTAWA — Analysis of federal tax breaks released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) suggests that men are capturing the majority of benefits from tax deductions, credits and loopholes.
OTTAWA—A new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) reveals the best and worst cities to be a woman in Canada in 2019. Overall, this year’s report shows that while measured progress has been made, women are still waiting for meaningful change in communities across the country.
This annual study provides a snapshot of the gaps in men and women’s access to economic security, personal security, education, health, and positions of leadership in Canada’s largest 26 metropolitan areas.
This report assesses who benefits from federal tax breaks and finds that men are capturing the majority of benefits from tax deductions, credits and loopholes. The portion of benefits currently going to men compared to women from 45 federal tax expenditures (tax deductions, credits, breaks and loopholes), and finds that only eight (19%) pay out greater amounts to women than men.
For six weeks in May and June 1919, approximately 35,000 workers in the Prairie city of Winnipeg walked off the job to voice their frustration with a range of issues, from a lack of collective bargaining rights and union recognition to increasing inequality. Indeed, the strike was part of a broader wave of worker revolts that swept across Canada and the world in 1919, as working people in numerous Canadian cities and countries used the strike—the withdrawal of labour power—to push for change.
This May, Canada marks the 100th anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike, when tens of thousands of people walked off their jobs in sympathy and solidarity with building and metal trades workers whose employers were refusing to bargain for fair wages and working conditions.Though the strike failed in its immediate goals, the example it set reverberated across the country and the world, inspiring political upheaval at all levels in Canada, and ultimately transforming the balance of power between workers and the bosses for many generations.
Regina — Canada ranks very poorly among peer nations for overall quality measures and rates of access to regulated child care, and Saskatchewan ranks the lowest of all Canadian provinces. A new report from the CCPA-Saskatchewan explores the piecemeal way in which child care policy has been developed by successive governments of all political stripes since 1969, and offers several recommendations for how to improve child care services that are of vital interest to the public.

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