Gender equality

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It’s easier to think that violence is something that happens to someone else—in a different country, a different community, a different home. But the truth is that every day, everywhere, women are raped, beaten and killed just because they are women. Women like Loretta Saunders, an Inuk student at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax. A young woman who was committed to understanding why aboriginal women and girls continue to experience violence on a scale far beyond the rest of Canada’s population. A young woman whose body was found at the side of a New Brunswick highway last week.
This edition of Work Life forms part of the research by CCPA’s National Office for an upcoming report, "Working across Canada" which will analyze quantitative and qualitative data to determine where workers are more likely to have decent jobs and be protected by adequate employment and labour standards.
Hennessy’s Index is a monthly listing of numbers, written by the CCPA's Trish Hennessy, about Canada and its place in the world. For other months, visit: http://policyalternatives.ca/index
Ottawa – Quatre-vingt-six pourcent (86%) des familles Canadiennes ne bénéficieront en rien du fractionnement du revenu que le gouvernement fédéral entend mettre en place selon une étude publiée aujourd’hui par le Centre canadien de politiques alternatives (CCPA).
OTTAWA—Eighty-six percent of Canadian families would gain no benefit from the proposed Conservative income splitting plan, says a new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
This study examines the cost and the distributional impact of three income splitting scenarios: pension income splitting; income splitting for families with children under 18, as the Conservatives have pledged; and income splitting for all families. The study finds that the impact of income splitting in all scenarios is very unequal and the lost revenue for Canadian governments would be substantial.
For Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs, the rewards start clocking in very early into the New Year. The infographic below highlights some key numbers around executive pay in Canada. Find out more in our report, All in a Day's Work? CEO Pay in Canada. (Click to enlarge)
OTTAWA— Progress on ending violence against women in Canada is stalled by the absence of a coherent national policy and consistent information about the levels of that violence says a study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
This study finds that progress on ending violence against women in Canada is stalled by the absence of a coherent national policy and consistent information about the levels of that violence. The study estimates the combined cost of adult sexual assault and intimate partner violence in Canada, and also makes several recommendations on how to improve the situation.
For the past year, Canadian national news outlets have led a distracting narrative about the status of abortion in Canada. They have focused almost solely on covering two motions in the House of Commons -- motions with the potential to reopen the abortion debate. The first motion proposed to study when a fetus in utero becomes a person, the second to have Parliament condemn sex-selective abortion. Both motions failed to pass, but their defeats have only solidified a flawed assumption that the legal status of abortion is what determines a woman's right to abortion in Canada.