Education

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While post-secondary institutions are places of learning, they also employ thousands of people across a broad spectrum of job classifications. This report explores the extent to which workers in Canada’s post-secondary institutions are experiencing precarity. More precisely, it asks whether employment on university and college campuses in Ontario is becoming more precarious, for whom and for what reasons. 
OTTAWA — Precarious employment is on the rise in Ontario’s post-secondary sector, a new study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives has found. The report examines the prevalence of precarious work on campuses and finds that certain workers are becoming more vulnerable to precarity. Fifty-three per cent of college and university workers in the province are to some extent precariously employed, according to analysis of Labour Force Survey (LFS) data. The study also includes first-hand accounts of the impacts of precarity from a recent survey of workers.
In this issue: Fossil fuel industry accustomed to guarding the hen house, documents reveal Call for public inquiry into fracking Rosenbluth lecture: Inclusive growth and the future of work BC First Nations and renewable energy BC Budget 2018 recommendations Adult basic education 20th anniversary retrospectives Submissions to the new BC government from the CCPA–BC Photos from the 2017 Gala 2017 Power of Youth Awards A crucial time of year for us
The looming Ontario election means that, once again, education will be a key topic of debate. This issue of Our Schools/Our Selves focuses on a number of key issues that education workers, parents, students and public education advocates are confronting in schools and communities, and offers on-the-ground commentary and analysis of what needs to be done for us to get this right.
The looming Ontario election means that, once again, education will be a key topic of discussion. This issue of Our Schools/Our Selves focuses on a number of key issues that education workers, parents, students and public education advocates are confronting in schools and communities, and offers on-the-ground commentary and analysis of what needs to be done for us to get this process right. It also provides updates from other jurisdictions grappling with the restructuring—or its aftermath—of education.
This report card reviews the federal government's progress in 16 key policy areas at the halfway mark of their term. It finds that, despite some positive first steps, the Liberals’ ambitious talk hasn’t been backed up with the action needed to make these promises a reality. With two years left in the term, the report card includes suggested next steps to help the Liberal government fulfill the progressive agenda they committed to leading up to the election. Among the recommendations:
Governments have often turned to investments in higher education to generate hope and opportunity for young people and others seeking better jobs and social mobility.  They may have a more receptive audience now more than ever, with younger generations facing increasingly precarious work prospects.
Welcome to the new Our Schools / Our Selves! Thanks so much for your patience. No doubt you’ve noticed that this is the spring/summer issue, and it breaks the (visual) mold you’ve grown accustomed to. We have launched a major redesign to try and ensure the look of the publication is as accessible and engaging as the contents we publish. Through this process, we will be temporarily moving to double issues for the next few months.

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