Employment and labour

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Illustration by Alisha Davidson As the Ontario and Quebec governments design their versions of a basic income pilot program, Canadians find themselves engaged in a policy question we haven’t grappled with in almost half a century: how should the welfare state evolve? 
TORONTO – Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs have set a new record: their total compensation in 2015 hit a new high at $9.5 million, on average, according to a new Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) report. The report shows Canada’s 100 highest paid CEOs on the TSX index now make 193 times more than someone earning an average wage.
By 11:47am today, just before most Canadians are starting their lunch break on the first official work day of the year, Canada’s highest paid CEOs will have already pocketed $49,510. It takes the average worker an entire year, working full-time to make that amount. And not much has changed over the past 10 years. Despite public outrage over exorbitantly high compensation packages, CEO pay has continued unabated, weathering all kinds of economic storms, and soaring to new highs.
The CCPA has been tracking CEO pay in Canada for 10 years, and in that time we've found that little has changed. Despite public outrage over exorbitantly high compensation packages, CEO pay has continued unabated, weathering all kinds of economic storms, and soaring to new highs.
HALIFAX/ANTIGONISH, NS—Two working parents with two children need to each earn a minimum of $19.17 an hour to make ends meet in Halifax, and $17.30 an hour in Antigonish, says a new study released today by the the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives–Nova Scotia, in partnership with the Antigonish Poverty Reduction Coalition.
This study uses the Canadian Living Wage Framework to update the living wage in Halifax (first calculated in June 2015), and provides a much-needed calculation of the living wage for Antigonish, a rural community in Nova Scotia. The study finds that two working parents with two children need to each earn a minimum of $19.17 an hour to make ends meet in Halifax, and $17.30 an hour in Antigonish.
Pursuant to new provincial and federal effluent guidelines, the City of Portage la Prairie is required to upgrade its wastewater facilities, known as the Water Pollution Control Facility (WPCF). The new Public-Private Partnership (P3) project has not undergone public scrutiny. Past examples point to P3s being more expensive than public management of these project.
First published in the Winnipeg Free Press, Dec 6, 2016 Those of us who were hoping that the Throne Speech would have details about a strategy for Manitoba’s North were disappointed.   There seems to be a deliberate effort to not mention the Port of Churchill or the Hudson Bay Rail Line in any mention of the North. The absence is odd given the necessity of both for the regional economy and in the case of Churchill’s deep-water port, Arctic sovereignty.
Honouring Ellen Olfert, founder of SAFE Workers of Tomorrow In 1995, 19 year old Stephen Nicholson was on the job site working in a paint booth. He was working on the exhaust system and had been lowered into the vent when suddenly paint residue ignited and engulfed Stephen in flames. There was no rescue plan in place and it took several minutes before Stephen was pulled from the vent. He suffered third degree burns to most of his body.
On October 28th, an unusual joint statement was released by the University of Manitoba (U of M) administration and the union representing faculty, the University of Manitoba Faculty Association (UMFA). Unusual because these two entities are in the middle of bargaining a collective agreement and one would expect each side to be posturing against the other. No, they haven’t reached an agreement.