Employment and labour

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Carillion, a major global player in the promo­tion of Public-Private Partnerships (P3s) has gone into liquidation in the UK. The collapse of this massive company is a case study of all that is wrong with P3s as an approach to building and operating public infrastructure. Carillion sponsored and financed over 60 P3s but more importantly provided the facility management services for them once construction was com­pleted. It was the second largest builder in the UK. It also held many government outsourcing contracts and undertook project financing as well as construction. 
OTTAWA—Communities across Canada need a national strategy to ensure the move to a zero-carbon economy leaves no one behind, according to a new report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). For the first time, the report uses census data to identify the regions in each province with the greatest reliance on fossil fuel jobs. 
Manitoba is a province of economic growth and economic disparity. It is a province with low unemployment rates, diverse development and incredible resource wealth.  On the flip side, Manitoba has continuously had some of the highest child poverty rates in Canada, the highest homicide rates, and Winnipeg has been called the most racist city in Canada.  This paradox of development and disparity is not without hope. In Manitoba there is also a rich set of grassroots organizations intent on tackling poverty, racism, crime and disparity.
In this issue: Fossil fuel industry accustomed to guarding the hen house, documents reveal Call for public inquiry into fracking Rosenbluth lecture: Inclusive growth and the future of work BC First Nations and renewable energy BC Budget 2018 recommendations Adult basic education 20th anniversary retrospectives Submissions to the new BC government from the CCPA–BC Photos from the 2017 Gala 2017 Power of Youth Awards A crucial time of year for us
Disruption. It’s the catchphrase du jour, usually wielded by one presumptuous tech upstart or another to challenge the market power of an allegedly ossifying incumbent. Frequently, but not always, to justify the displacement of low- or middle-income workers with an even more precarious, low-cost, on-demand workforce.
Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a rally in San Baltazar, Chichicapam, Oaxaca in March 2016 (Wikimedia Commons)
In The Fight for a $15 Minimum Wage in Saskatchewan, University of Regina Business professor Dr. Andrew Stevens explodes many of the more prevalent myths about the minimum wage and minimum wage workers. Dr. Stevens shows that minimum wage workers can no longer be perceived as mostly teenagers working part-time in a small family-run business. Rather, minimum wage earners in the province are older, disproportionately female and many work for large, corporate employers. As Dr.
In this submission to the BC Fair Wages Commission, the CCPA-BC highlights the urgency for British Columbia to adopt a $15 minimum wage by March 2019.  BC’s current minimum wage is a poverty-level wage. Low-wage workers need a significant boost to their income and they have been waiting a long time. Over 400,000 British Columbians—22 per cent of all paid employees in the province—work for less than $15 per hour and they would significantly benefit from a $15 minimum wage.
This report card reviews the federal government's progress in 16 key policy areas at the halfway mark of their term. It finds that, despite some positive first steps, the Liberals’ ambitious talk hasn’t been backed up with the action needed to make these promises a reality. With two years left in the term, the report card includes suggested next steps to help the Liberal government fulfill the progressive agenda they committed to leading up to the election. Among the recommendations:
Illustration by Alisha Davidson