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Nous publions le Budget fédéral alternatif 2020 — notre 25e édition depuis 1995 — à un moment très instable pour le Canada et le monde. La combinaison de COVID-19, une vente mondiale de pétrole et l'effondrement des marchés financiers mondiaux menace non seulement la santé et la sécurité publiques, mais aussi la stabilité de notre économie, qui sera probablement en récession d'ici la fin de l'année. Il est maintenant temps de penser au-delà des correctifs fiscaux standard et des plans de sauvetage des banques.
For British Columbia to meet its emissions targets and not perpetuate the climate crisis, it must phase out its fossil fuel industries by mid-century. This means strategically and thoughtfully planning for the coming energy transition, including full decarbonization of the economy by 2050 and a fair transition for workers and resource-dependent communities. The report outlines a four-part framework for a managed wind-down in BC, which must be planned with First Nations, to phase out fossil fuel industries over the next 20 to 30 years.
VANCOUVER — If BC is to meet its emissions targets and not perpetuate the climate crisis, it must phase out its fossil fuel industries by mid-century, says a report released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
On November 10, 2019, a U.S.-backed group of neofascists in Bolivia deposed the government of Evo Morales on spurious accusations of electoral fraud. The coup government’s first act was to unleash the army and police on mainly Indigenous protestors in the capital of La Paz, killing at least 10 people. Further massacres pushed the coup’s death toll above 30, with hundreds more wounded in clashes between supporters of Morales’s Movement Towards Socialism (MAS) party and state police.
 REUTERS/ERIN SCOTT
The idea of a Green New Deal—a radical and comprehensive transformation of the economy to cut greenhouse gas emissions while tackling inequality—has been gaining steam as an organizing principle for the environmental and social justice movements. Yet there are many questions that GND advocates have yet to think through or agree on. Like how can we produce enough electricity to rapidly replace all fossil fuels? Will new, green jobs be good, unionized jobs that are accessible in the places where jobs are needed most? Crucially, how will we pay for it all?
In this issue: Celebrating excellence in research The Canada Pension Plan is fuelling the climate crisis Affordable non-market rental housing Expanding the affordability conversation When it comes to climate action, the public is ahead of our polictics Inquiry into gig work needed in BC 2019 Rosenbluth lecture recap BC government fossil fuel subsidy data finally made public Our annual gala in pictures Donor spotlight: Bob and Sue Evans CMP Conference 2020 
(Vancouver) Fracking should be immediately banned close to BC Hydro’s two existing Peace River dams as well as the Site C dam construction project until a full public inquiry determines whether a comprehensive ban is warranted, the BC office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives says. 
Our Time at the September 27 Global Climate Strike (photo by Laura Cameron)

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