Employment and labour

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With the country facing significant and unpredictable headwinds going into another federal election year, the 2019 Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) shows that Canada can boost competitiveness and encourage innovation by investing in people, not by giving corporations more tax cuts.
Click to enlarge (files open in a new window). You can also download maps (PDF) via the links below. 
The news media play a strong role in shaping how many Canadians understand issues like climate change—and the tensions between the fossil fuel industry and those seeking to transition to a low-carbon economy. But are the media providing a clear view of the debate surrounding these issues? And are all stakeholders’ voices being heard? Short answer: There’s reason for concern.
Much of the argument advanced in support of expanding Canada’s fossil fuel production centres on job creation and economic benefits. Politicians, pundits and corporate spokespeople who support fossil fuel infrastructure projects—such as new oil and gas pipelines—often evoke this rhetoric when they appear in the media.
"Fossil fuel proponents often claim their support for the industry is connected to the needs and interests of energy workers—and our news media repeat and reinforce this claim, bringing it to the fore of public and political debates. But largely absent are the voices of actual workers and their unions; in the news media, their interests are subsumed into those of the fossil fuel industry." —Robert Hackett, lead author of Jobs vs the Environment?
VANCOUVER—A new study finds that BC’s news media frequently reinforce the assumption that there is an inevitable trade-off between environmental protection and job creation. Released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and Corporate Mapping Project, Jobs vs the environment? Mainstream and alternative media coverage of pipeline controversies analyzes over 300 recent articles about Canadian pipeline projects.
TORONTO—Ontario’s labour market shows stubborn patterns of employment and income inequality along racial and gender lines, according to new research from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Ontario (CCPA-ON) office.
Ontario’s labour market shows stubborn patterns of employment and income inequality along racial and gender lines. This report presents a portrait of the province’s racialized labour market as of 2016, and compares it to similar data from 2006. The study finds that racialized workers in Ontario continue to experience higher unemployment rates and significant wage gaps compared to non-racialized workers.  
New study examines reliance on precarious jobs on university campuses; Ontario, Quebec and B.C. have contract faculty rates above national average. OTTAWA—Canadian universities are relying heavily on precariously-employed faculty on campus, according to a new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
OTTAWA – Selon une nouvelle étude publiée aujourd’hui par le Centre canadien de politiques alternatives, les universités canadiennes dépendent énormément des enseignants précaires sur les campus.

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